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Usually it doesn’t make much sense to repeat code from a lecture demo, but for the Dropit project I think it’s worth to post an article based on a slight variation using the new features of UIKit Dynamics available in iOS 9.

This is perhaps a good time to mention that all the CS193P assignment solutions so far created has been based on Swift 2.1 and iOS 9, whereas the Stanford U. lectures and demos are based on Swift 1.2 and iOS 8.

The motivation to create the variation was a result of attempting to implement assignment 5. Particularly the ball which is a UIView and ideally should be round, even though UIViews are obviously rectangles. The good news is that iOS 9 provides a collisionBoundsType property which can be easily overridden in UIView:

class SphereView: UIView {
    // iOS 9 specific
    override var collisionBoundsType: UIDynamicItemCollisionBoundsType {
        return .Ellipse
    }
}

This sets the bounds of the view to be an ellipse and allows the right boundary collisions
as you might expect from a ball or sphere.

dropit-spaces-between-spheres dropit-no-spaces-between-spheres

The UIFieldBehavior new in iOS 9, also seems very interesting with properties like: dragField, springField, electricField, magneticField, noiseFieldWithSmoothness and more, which opens the door to new possibilities of animation in your apps. The Dropit variation also adds the noiseFieldWithSmoothness behavior for some cool
visual effects.

dropit-spheres-in-noise-field

With debugEnabled for UIDynamicAnimator (by adding a Swift bridging header *), you can see the noise field in action as it shifts by adding random noise. To enable UIView debugging, the following code needs to be added in the bridging header file:

@import UIKit;

@interface UIDynamicAnimator (AAPLDebugInterfaceOnly)

// Used in DropitViewController.swift file:
// lazilyCreatedDynamicAnimator.debugEnabled = true
@property (nonatomic, getter=isDebugEnabled) BOOL debugEnabled;
@end

Full source code of the demo is available here at Github:
https://github.com/sanjibahmad/Variation-on-Dropit-Demo

Video Demo

For more on what’s new in UIKit Dynamics in iOS 9, please see the WWDC 2015 video: What’s New in UIKit Dynamics and Visual Effects

* Please see this article on how to add the Swift bridging header: Adding a Swift Bridging Header

I have compiled the following resources based on my own experience and what I believe would be an effective learning path for beginners to get up to speed on iOS development.

1. Udacity

Start with the free iOS courses available at Udacity. They are not only fun and engaging but at the end will help you build 4 resume-worthy demos that you can showcase.

Additionally the following iOS specific free courses from Udacity are also recommended:

Time commitment: X months depending on your commitment

2. Ray Wenderlich

While taking the Udacity course, visit Ray Wenderlich http://www.raywenderlich.com/tutorials from time to time. Pick a topic or article that interests you and go through it.

The idea is, instead of going through everything available from A-Z, you pick something of interest and thoroughly explore it. Each article is on a particular topic and the time-investment is at most a few hours (in contrast to going through an entire book or course).

Time commitment: X hours depending on your commitment

The problem that I have experienced in learning any new technology is information retention. I found the above 2 techniques work well for me because:

  1. One path explores the area comprehensively with loads of relevant industry-specific projects, materials, demos, practice, quizzes, etc.
  2. Another path runs in parallel, diving deep into topics of personal interest for short sprints.

3. Stanford U.

Update, Jun 6, 2016: The latest course from Stanford U. “Developing iOS 9 Apps with Swift” can be found here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/developing-ios-9-apps-swift/id1104579961

Once the Udacity courses are done, take the Stanford U. course CS193P available for free on iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/developing-ios-8-apps-swift/id961180099) for upping your game-level on iOS development. Some special highlights of the CS193P course that I found interesting were:

Using enums, structures, protocols, property observers, optional chaining, GCD, code re-use, OO design, MVC, autolayouts, iPhone/iPad compatibility, avoiding memory cycles, animations, internationalization, programming insights, well-designed assignments and much more. Using these in practice and specially in correct form as expected from a Stanford U. course, will definitely make you a better developer.

4. Additional Resources

Then further sharpen your axe, polish your skills and stay up-to-date with:

5. Algorithms

Useful for practicing algorithms in Swift for coding-tests/interviews. The sites below allow you to type the code solutions in Swift and run them online for evaluation.

6. Even More Resources

And here are even more resources added on request by the owners of the respective sites.
Enjoy 🙂